Tips and tricks

Lagrange

Tips and tricks

An egg in the fondue pot: Great Eggspectations!

Convivial Dining

Is the fondue pot almost empty? How do you make the most of the ooey-gooey cheese left at the bottom? This trick is truly eggceptional! Crack an egg into the pot and stir into the cheese, adding all the leftover bits of bread until everything holds together (kind of like a cheesy French toast)! A rousing encore that's sure to please.

Winemaker's Fondue: A real melting pot!

Convivial Dining

A truly surprising twist on a classic, this fondue uses cinnamon, coriander and cloves simmered in a bath of Alsatian wine. For the meat, favour chicken breast or veal cutlets, and let them cook slowly and luxuriously. Different, subtle, refined, unique!

Forester's Fondue: a feast!

Convivial Dining

Using the same ingredients as for a cheese fondue, mix in dried mushrooms to add a savory flavor that's sure to please!

Add more flavor to your cheese fondue

Convivial Dining

Add a spoonful of mustard to your kirsch to turn up the flavor and add a little zing to your fondue. With Lagrange, there's never a dull dish or a dull moment.

A tip from Lagrange for robust raclette!

Convivial Dining

The key to great raclette is great cheese! If you can, find a cheese that is labelled AOC (Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée/Controlled Designation of Origin) this means the cheese is certified as made in a specific geographical designation. You can find raclette cheese made in Switzerland or the Savoy region of France.

Apart from the classic raclette cheese, it also can be made smoked or flavored with herbs and spices such as pepper, cumin and white wine. Don't be afraid to mix things up: why not add in a few slices of Morbier or Bleu for a unique fondue experience!

A brief History of (Raclette) Cheese

Convivial Dining

Raclette: just the word makes you think of wintery nights around the table with friends and family, but where did it all begin? From the middle-ages, shepherds often enjoyed "roasted cheese", but it wasn't until 1874 that the word "raclette" first came to be. With the popularity of winter sports around the 20th century, raclette took off as a staple for winter cooking. Its creamy texture is ideal for eating hot and melted.

South-West Raclette

Convivial Dining

Thinly sliced duck breast on a bed of melted goats cheese...don't forget the potatoes for a little extra indulgence!

Non-stick Crêpes: Flip out!

Convivial Dining

One simple trick for crêpes that don't stick to the pan: Add a tablespoon of olive oil or butter to your batter. They key to non-stick crêpes is a batter that is thin and liquid. The easiest way to thin out crêpe batter is simple to add more water!

Quality crêpes need quality ingredients!

Convivial Dining

High-quality products are always a must, but don't forget about using whole milk and smooth flour. You can fight lumps (the enemy of any crêpe batter!) but sifting the flour beforehand. For ideal results, start by mixing your eggs and milk, stirring well. If you are are losing the battle of the lumps, a quick mix with your Lagrange Mix Pro will do the trick!

A Brief History of Pancake Tuesday

Convivial Dining

Shrove Tuesday (known in some countries as Pancake Tuesday or Pancake day) is a day in February or March preceding Ash Wednesday (the first day of Lent), which is celebrated in some countries by consuming pancakes. In others, especially those where it is called Mardi Gras or some translation thereof, this is a carnival day, and also the last day of "fat eating" or "gorging" before the fasting period of Lent.

Stone Top and Plancha: Healthy eating with a sizzle!

Cooking

If you're trying to eat healthy, or prefer a lighter approach to coking the Stone Top Grill and Plancha are perfect allies to cut fat and grease, while still enjoying the flavor and nutrients of your favorite meats and veggies.

A quick tip: Make sure to salt the cooking surface beforehand to avoid sticking!

Stone Top Grill: Get saucy!

Convivial Dining

Mayonnaise, bearnaise, aïoli and ketchup...been there, done that! Make a change by adding some unique sauces and dips to your spread: paprika goes great with beef and fish, a little truffle oil or even the famous Lagrange family walnut sauce (a heavily guarded secret!!)

A Brief History of Stone Top Grilling

Convivial Dining

Prehistoric people have always been used slabs of stone over the campfire to cook that day's catch (grilled Mastadon, anyone?) This system was eventually adapted for the modern world, and caught on as a way to cook without added fats. In 1989, Lagrange debuted their first electric Stone Top Grill. As good for the environment as it is for you: this machine has absolutely zero CO2 emissions!

Add a splash of color to your yogurt!

Catalogue US

Lagrange offers a full range of fun fruity flavors for your yogurt. Vanilla, strawberry, coconut, peach, lemon and salted butter caramel. Switch up the flavors for a colorful and tasty treat!

How can I get firmer yogurt?

Homemade Food

Firstly, the longer you leave your mixture in the yogurt maker, the firmer the yogurt will become. But be careful! Longer cooking time creates a stronger sour taste. Secondly, you can also add a teaspoon of powdered milk to your mixture for thickness. But take care not to move the machine while in use, avoid placing it on a refrigerator or dishwasher, as the vibrations can disturb the cooking process.

Produce on the grill produces delicious results!

Cooking

Though it may be a surprising choice, a vegetarian barbecue can be a real treat for vegans, veggies and carnivores alike! Sliced eggplant and zucchini make for a savory and succulent grilled entrée. You can also wrap a medley of vegetables in aluminum foil to toss on the grill for a tender and delicious dish. For dessert, fruit skewers sprinkled with brown sugar caramelize to finish the meal on a sweet note!

A Brief History of Ice Cream

Homemade Food

The first origins of ice cream date back to ancient China, where it was discovered by Marco Polo and brought to Europe. The Italians adopted it as their own, developing the "gelati" that we know today. The first American ice cream sundae was invented in 1892, and the famous ice cream cone came about in 1904, invented by a Syrian at the World's Fair. The best ice cream is always homemade, but the original home can still be found in Casa Giolitti in Rome.

What's the secret to firm ice cream?

Homemade Food

If your ice cream isn't holding its shape follow these tips: It is essential to leave your mixture to chill as long as possible (refrigerate for several hours) and to have to good ice cream maker or sorbet maker...luckily Lagrange has both!

Dress up your ice cream with dried fruit and flowers

Homemade Food

If you're making a pear sorbet, keep a few slices of the fruit and put in your Nutris food dehydrator. Use the dried slices to garnish your sorbet for a professional touch! You can also dry flower petals for a bucolic effect. Dessert just got dressy!

How to make homemade ice cream cones?

Homemade Food

Use your waffle maker to make thin waffles, once cooked remove and roll them into a cone shape while still warm. Let sit, and the waffle will harden into the perfect seat for your favorite scoop!

Flavorful Waffles

Waffle Makers

Let your imagination run wild and use aromatic ingredients like almond, orange blossom, lemon zest to perk up your morning waffle. For a sinful twist, add Grand Marnier or Calvados. The options are endless, we've even tried a pumpkin spice waffle...better than a latté!

A Brief History of Waffles

Waffle Makers

As the Lagrange family hails from Lyon, they prefer to say of waffles: "Even thought they may have originated in Belgium, it was in Lyon that the best waffle recipe was born in 1799".